African Rock Art: Research, digital outputs and heritage management (4 and 5 November)

African Rock Art: Research, digital outputs and heritage management (4 and 5 November)

Friday 4 November 2016, 9.30-17.30
Saturday 5 November 2016, 9.00-17.30
Stevenson Lecture Theatre
Free, booking essential

This conference seeks to act as a forum of debate about the different methods in which digital technologies can be used to record, manage and present rock art information in Africa. It will also discuss the best strategies to deal with the challenges of the digital revolution, considering how to bridge the gaps between institutions, professionals and local communities throughout the continent to protect this unique heritage.

Please note that one ticket is valid for both days of the conference. 


Archaeological practices in contemporary Cypriot art

Archaeological practices in contemporary Cypriot art

The ground beneath our feet

Friday 30 September, 18.30
BP Lecture Theatre

Is reconstructing the past as speculative as constructing the future? Exploring the politics and poetics of archaeological finds, four prominent artists from Cyprus – Alev Adil, Haris Epaminonda, Maria Loizidou and Christodoulos Panayiotou – will discuss the ‘archaeological turn’ in contemporary Cypriot art. Developed by Christina Lambrou and Elena Parpa, the artists’ talks will be followed by a round-table discussion chaired by Dr Gabriel Koureas, Birkbeck, University of London.

Organised in collaboration with Cyprus High Commission Cultural Section under the auspices of the High Commissioner for the Republic of Cyprus Euripides L Evriviades to celebrate Cyprus’ National Day. 


The pasts and presence of art in South Africa

The pasts and presence of art in South Africa

Saturday 29 October, 10.00 - 17.00
BP Lecture Theatre
£80, members/concessions £60.00.

Global interest in South African art has concentrated on evidence of early human behaviour, as well as on the region’s rich rock art tradition. In the first case, the mere presence or absence of ‘art’ has been regarded as an important diagnostic of ‘modern’ forms of behaviour. In the second, rock ‘arts’ have been interpreted largely through a wealth of regionally derived ethnographies. However, contemporary South African art has long been explicitly political and engaged in projects of societal transformation.

This conference will attempt to consider ‘art’ as part of a wider suite of technological practices. In making this move, it will draw on the ideas developed by Alfred Gell in his important essay The Technology of Enchantment and the Enchantment of Technology, as well as his posthumously published Art and Agency.

The conference will reconsider ontologies, technologies and agents, and ask not whether or not ‘art’ is present, nor whether artefacts illustrate particular aspects of behaviour, but rather how their presence and creation made a difference to the past.