Ancient lives, new discoveries

Ancient lives, new discoveries

Think you know mummies? Think again.

Extended until 19th April 2015

The exhibition will introduce visitors to eight real people who were mummified in ancient Egypt and Sudan. Using the latest technology to understand the mummies, the exhibition will unlock hidden secrets to build up a picture of their lives in the Nile Valley over a remarkable 4,000 years – from prehistoric Egypt to Christian Sudan.
From a priest’s daughter to a temple singer, a man of high status to a child, a temple doorkeeper to a woman with a Christian tattoo, visitors will find out how they lived and how they died, unravel the mysteries of mummification and piece together a world that has been lost for centuries. Visitors will discover that underneath all the apparent differences, we all share a remarkable common humanity.

Sponsored by Julius Baer.
Technology partner Samsung.

Please note: tickets for the same day are only available to purchase at the Ticket Desk in the Museum and are not available to purchase online or by telephone.

Image:Mummy of a priest's daughter named Tamut in a painted case, and CT scan of the same mummy. From Thebes, Egypt, 22nd Dynasty, c. 900 BC. 


Ancient lives, new discoveries: Restaurant package

Ancient lives, new discoveries: Restaurant package

Available 27 December 2014 – 25 March 2015

Combine your exhibition visit with a 2 or 3-course lunch enjoying a North African inspired menu, or a delicious afternoon tea, in the stunning Great Court Restaurant. Subject to availability.

2-course lunch and then 14.00 exhibition entry = £30
3-course lunch and then 14.00 exhibition entry = £35
14.00 exhibition entry and then afternoon tea = £25 


Ancient lives, new discoveries: Friday dinner package

Ancient lives, new discoveries: Friday dinner package

Available 27 December 2014 - 25 March 2015 (Friday only)

Combine your exhibition visit with a 2 or 3-course dinner enjoying a North African inspired menu, or a delicious afternoon tea, in the stunning Great Court Restaurant. Subject to availability.

Afternoon tea and then 18.00 exhibition entry = £25
18.00 exhibition entry and then 2-course dinner = £30
18.00 exhibition entry and then 3-course dinner = £35 


Ming: 50 years that changed China

Ming: 50 years that changed China

The BP exhibition

18 September 2014 – 5 January 2015

This major exhibition will explore a golden age in China’s history.

Between AD 1400 and 1450, China was a global superpower run by one family – the Ming dynasty – who established Beijing as the capital and built the Forbidden City. During this period, Ming China was thoroughly connected with the outside world. Chinese artists absorbed many fascinating influences, and created some of the most beautiful objects and paintings ever made. The exhibition will feature a range of these spectacular objects – including exquisite porcelain, gold, jewellery, furniture, paintings, sculptures and textiles – from museums across China and the rest of the world. Many of them have only been very recently discovered and have never been seen outside China.

Please note: tickets for the same day are only available to purchase at the Ticket Desk in the Museum and are not available to purchase online or by telephone.

Image:Detail of a cloisonné jar, decorated with dragons and imperial mark. China, Ming dynasty, Xuande mark and period, 1426– 1435.  


Germany: memories of a nation

Germany: memories of a nation

16 October 2014 - 25 January 2015
Room 35
£10, Members/under 16s free

This exhibition will examine elements of German history from the past 600 years in the context of the fall of the Berlin Wall 25 years ago. From the Renaissance to reunification and beyond, the show will use objects to investigate the complexities of addressing a German history which is full of both triumphs and tragedies. Navigate through Germany’s many political changes –from the Holy Roman Empire through unification in the 1870s and the troubled 20th century to today’s economic powerhouse at the centre of Europe. Explore art by Dürer, Holbein and Richter, and marvel at technological achievements through the ages which gave the world Gutenberg’s printing press, Meissen porcelain, the Bauhaus movement and modern design icon the VW Beetle.