Daughters of the Dust

Daughters of the Dust

Sunday 18 June, 2017, 14.00 - 17.00
BP Lecture Theatre
£3, Members/concessions £2

Referenced in Beyoncé's Lemonade, and newly restored, Julie Dash's acclaimed 1991 feature was the first by an African-American woman to be widely seen. Set on an island off South Carolina, it tells of generations of the Gullah people, descended from slaves, and their migration northward. Poetic in style, and using the Gullah dialect, it evokes a rich yet unknown cultural memory, not unlike the writing of Alice Walker and Toni Morrison.

1991, 112 minutes, Cert. PG

Curated and introduced by Ian Christie, Birkbeck College, University of London 


In the land of the Headhunters

In the land of the Headhunters

Saturday 10 June 2017, 14.00-17.00
Stevenson Lecture Theatre
£3, Members/concessions £2

Edward S Curtis was a pioneering, if controversial, photographer of Native American life. In the land of the Headhunters, his innovative and unique silent film from 1914, was entirely cast from the indigenous people of the Pacific Northwest Coast. It has now been beautifully restored and includes the original score.

It retells an ancient legend of the Kwakwaka’wakw. To gain power from the spirit forces, Motana, the son of a great chief, goes on a vigil journey. Along the way he fights a sorcerer to win the girl of his dreams. (Cert TBC)

The film will be preceded by the short film Potlatch: to give by Kwakwaka’wakw filmmaker Barb Cranmer and followed by a Q&A with Michael Walling, Director of Border Crossings' Origins Festival, and British Museum Curator Amber Lincoln.

In association with Border Crossings' Origins Festival. Find out more at originsfestival.com 


Miss Hokusai

Miss Hokusai

Saturday 1 July 2017, 14.30 - 16.15
BP Lecture Theatre
£5, Members/concessions £3

This award-winning animated film explores the later years of Hokusai.

O-Ei works with her father Katsushika Hokusai on his great works but has to deal with his short temper and lack of interest in worldly things such as money or society. O-Ei, however, has inherited her father’s talent and it soon starts to get her into trouble.

Japan, 93 minutes, 2015, Cert. 12

Presented in collaboration with Japan House