Barry Cunliffe on steppe nomads of Eurasia

Barry Cunliffe on steppe nomads of Eurasia

Friday 27 October 2017, 18.30-19.30
BP Lecture Theatre
£5, Members/concessions £3

Historian and archaeologist Professor Sir Barry Cunliffe examines the dramatic human story of the earliest domestication of wild horses on the Eurasian steppe.

Following his acclaimed book of 2016 By steppe, desert and ocean: the birth of Eurasia and in advance of his latest publication on the Scythians, this lecture examines the earliest domestication of horses by pastoralist nomads on the steppe, and the sudden emergence of predatory warrior hordes in the early centuries of the first millennium BC. 


Curator's introduction to Hokusai: beyond the Great Wave

Curator's introduction to Hokusai: beyond the Great Wave

Thursday 25 May 2017, 13.30 - 14.30
Saturday 10 June 2017, 13.30 - 14.30
Thursday 27 July 2017, 13.30 - 14.30
Thursday 3 August 2017, 13.30 - 14.30
BP Lecture Theatre (except 27 July: Stevenson Lecture Theatre)
This event is fully booked.

Exhibition Curator Tim Clark gives a 45-minute illustrated introduction to the exhibition Hokusai: beyond the Great Wave.

Please note the Saturday 10 June event features live subtitles for Deaf and hard of hearing visitors. 


The music of the clock, c. 1300–c. 1600

The music of the clock, c. 1300–c. 1600

Thursday 23 November 2017, 17.30 drinks reception before the lecture at 18.00
BP Lecture Theatre
Free, booking essential

The annual Dingwall-Beloe horological lecture 2017 will be given by Matthew Champion, Birkbeck, University of London.

Please arrive at 17.30 for a drinks reception before the lecture at 18.00.

This event was founded with funds bequeathed to the British Museum by former Assistant Keeper of Printed Books in the British Library Dr Eric Dingwall, and to the Clockmakers’ Company by the noted horological collector Mr Reginald Beloe. It is intended that these annual lectures should make new contributions to our understanding of the history of horology, at an international level. 


Yemen's architectural heritage in peril

Yemen's architectural heritage in peril

Saturday 5 August 2017, 18.00 - 19.30
BP Lecture Theatre
Free, booking essential

Yemen possesses one of the world’s finest treasure-troves of architecture, displaying a wondrous array of vernacular styles.

Three of its ancient cities – Shibam, Sana and Zabīd – are UNESCO World Heritage sites, and a number of other towns and building complexes around the country await inclusion on that list. Each urban setting possesses a distinct ‘sense of place’, resulting from a mixture of ingenuity, available construction materials, social relations, religious practices and local histories. Conflict and resistance, too, have contributed significantly to the history of Yemeni building design, town planning and civil engineering. The current hydra-headed conflict, however, involving international adversaries divided along political and sectarian lines, poses a threat of unprecedented scale to the country’s architectural heritage.

In this lecture, Trevor Marchand, SOAS, will take stock of the damage incurred as well as some of the current efforts to safeguard buildings and to sustain conservation programmes. He will also address factors – in addition to military conflict – that represent perhaps more enduring challenges to the survival of Yemen’s architecture and traditional building practices.

The lecture will take place after the Saturday session of the Seminar for Arabian Studies.