Bettany Hughes on Aphrodite

Bettany Hughes on Aphrodite

Monday 2 October 2017, 18.30 - 20.30
BP Lecture Theatre
Free, booking essential

Historian and broadcaster Bettany Hughes presents a special screening of her landmark documentary Aphrodite: a life.

The film investigates the archaeology of the goddess’ birthplace in Cyprus. Discover Aphrodite’s surprising origins, her enduring ability to inspire and excite successive generations across the millennia, and question your assumptions about the goddess of love.

Organised in collaboration with Cyprus High Commission Cultural Section under the auspices of the High Commissioner for the Republic of Cyprus Euripides L Evriviades to celebrate Cyprus’ National Day. 


Christmas with the London Philharmonic Choir

Christmas with the London Philharmonic Choir

Saturday 16 December 2017, 19:30-21:30
Great Court
£24.00 Members and their guests

Go on a journey through the history of Christmas music, from the grandeur of the Tudor court though to the classic Victorian Christmas, finishing with modern favourites.

Experience the sublime sound of the critically acclaimed London Philharmonic Choir as they serenade you with a feast of festive songs at the British Museum.

Working under conductors such as Pierre Boulez, Mark Elder, Daniele Gatti, Simon Rattle, Georg Solti and Franz Welser-Möst, the Choir has always met with critical acclaim. Widely regarded as one of the nation’s finest choirs, they perform regularly with the London Philharmonic Orchestra and other world-class orchestras at major venues and festivals throughout the year.

Your evening begins in the Egyptian Sculpture Gallery where you will enjoy festive treats such as mulled wine and mince pies. You will also have the opportunity to pick up a Christmas present or Gift Membership in the luxury Grenville Room.

£24 for Members and their guests, including a complimentary drink. Members may purchase tickets for up to six guests. Age 16+.

Important information
The performance runs for 90 minutes, including a 30- minute interval. Ticket holders may arrive from 19.00 through the Main entrance on Great Russell Street. Ticket holders who are in the Museum at closing time (17.30) must leave and re-enter at 19.00. Doors to the Great Court open at 19.25. Seating is provided for the duration of the performance and is unreserved, available on a first-come, first-served basis. The performance begins at 19.30 and latecomers will not be permitted entry. A pay bar will be available in the Egyptian Sculpture Gallery (Room 4) before the event and during the interval serving drinks and a selection of festive snacks. If you have any access requirements, contact the Membership Office before booking on friends@britishmuseum.org or 020 7323 8195. Tickets are subject to availability and are non-refundable. 


Following the Buddhist path: insights on the nature of mind

Following the Buddhist path: insights on the nature of mind

Friday 22 September 2017, 18.30 - 19.45
Stevenson Lecture Theatre
£5, Members/concessions £3

Theravada Buddhist nun and teacher Ajahn Sundara and TV presenter and psychotherapist Alistair Appleton reflect on their own experiences of Buddhist practice, philosophy and mindfulness.

TV presenter and writer Alistair Appleton ( Cash in the Attic, Escape to the Country) has been a practising Buddhist for almost two decades. He was trained originally in the Vajrayana traditions of Tibet, before becoming attracted to the simpler, more direct teachings of the Thai Forest lineage.

Ajahn Sundara is a Buddhist nun based Amaravati Buddhist Monastery, situated at the eastern end of the Chiltern Hills in south-east England and a namesake of Amaravati stupa of ancient India. 


Gregory Doran discusses Ovid in Shakespeare

Gregory Doran discusses Ovid in Shakespeare

Friday 29 September 2017, 18.30-19.45
BP Lecture Theatre
£8, Members/concessions £5

A joint venture with the Royal Shakespeare Company. This anticipates the RSC’s winter London Season at the Barbican, ROME MMXVII, comprising four of Shakespeare’s most gripping plays: Coriolanus, Julius Caesar, Antony & Cleopatra and Titus Andronicus.

Gregory Doran, (Artistic Director, RSC), discusses the role of the Roman poet Ovid in Shakespeare’s work. He is in conversation with Shakespeare historian, Dr Jonathan Bate, (Oxford University) and Dr Ross Thomas, (curator, Department of Greece and Rome, British Museum). They are joined by RSC actors presenting passages from Shakespeare which use Ovid as a source. 


Group Booking

Group Booking

Every day
Enter through King Edward entrance on Montague Place
Free, booking essential

Due to the significant increase in tour group visitors and to make the visitor experience pleasant for all visitors, it has become necessary for all tour groups to book their visit to the museum at least seven days in advance.

If bookings are not made in advance, groups may be denied immediate entry to the museum.

All tour groups must enter the museum using the King Edward entrance on Montague Place. This entrance provides space for group visits and dedicated coach parking.

Please be advised that if you wish to avoid the busiest times for tour group visits, you should not book for the 10:00, 14:00, or 15:00 time slots.

During the booking process please specify the number in your group and also if the majority of your visit will involve any one area of the Museum's collection. If you will be visiting many areas of the Museum but not one specific area in depth please put your group number in the 'General admission' category during the booking process.

If the people in your group are aged under 18, please use this ticket category regardless of area visited. If you are a UK school and are looking to make use of the Ford Centre for Young Visitors or book any of our workshops/galleries please do not book in via this link but visit the 'Learning' section of the website for further booking information

If any of your group have specific access needs please see the 'Visiting' section of the Museum's website for more information on all facilities available. This is also where you will find details of our full Visitor Regulations. 


Highlights Tour: around the world in 90 minutes

Highlights Tour: around the world in 90 minutes

Every Friday, Saturday and Sunday, 11.30 and 14.00 Tours meet at the Information Desk £12 per person

Explore the British Museum’s most famous treasures with an illuminating 90-minute guided tour. Discover the Rosetta Stone, the Lewis Chessmen and the Parthenon sculptures, as well as some lesser-known but fascinating objects, with expert guidance that will take you to the heart of the Museum’s collection.

This tour is designed for an adult audience and is not recommended for children under the age of 12. Please note that the tour will visit a number of galleries on different floors of the Museum and involves a considerable amount of walking. 


Lost and found: 20 years of treasure discoveries in England, Northern Ireland and Wales

Lost and found: 20 years of treasure discoveries in England, Northern Ireland and Wales

Friday 20 October 2107, 18.30-20.00
BP Lecture Theatre
£5, Members/concessions £3

Organised in collaboration with the Being Human Festival to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the commencement of the Treasure Act, this event explores 20 years of treasure discoveries from across England, Northern Ireland and Wales.

Join a panel of experts and curators from the British Museum as they dig deep into 20 years of ‘lost and found’ treasures to debate the best discovery of the past two decades. They ask who owns these treasures, how do we care for them, and what do they tell us about different regions' histories, as well as our own?

The event presents a preview of the Being Human Festival 2017 and is chaired by its Director, Professor Sarah Churchwell. Contributors include Michael Lewis, Sam Moorhead and Ian Richardson from the Museum's Department of Portable Antiquities and Treasure, as well as Julia Farley, Curator of European Iron Age Collections, and Neil Wilkin, Curator of British and European Bronze Age collections.

The Portable Antiquities Scheme is a DCMS-funded project at the British Museum that encourages the voluntary recording of archaeological objects found by members of the public in England and Wales. Find out more at finds.org.uk 


MUSO presents: The Unsung Scythians

MUSO presents: The Unsung Scythians

Friday 13 October 2017, 19.00 - 19.50
BP Lecture Theatre
Free, booking essential

The virtuoso musical improvisors of Impropera create the first (and perhaps last!) opera all about the ancient Scythians of the Siberian steppe, as part of the special late event Steppe it up!

Be prepared to be uplifted, enlightened and inspired, as MUSO sing the Scythians to life, with your support! No singing ability required – in fact it's a positive disadvantage...

The event will be followed by a free drop-in finale in the Great Court from 20.05 to 20.35.

‘Brilliantly clever and irresistibly funny’
Daily Telegraph

‘Beware – you can get addicted to Impropera’
BBC Radio 3 


Members Exclusive Lecture - Believing and belonging

Members Exclusive Lecture - Believing and belonging

Monday 23 October 2017
18.30 – 20.00
BP Lecture Theatre

An introductory talk by Jill Cook, curator of the exhibition that builds upon the BBC Radio 4 series Living with the gods: peoples, places and worlds beyond presented by former British Museum Director Neil MacGregor.

As human beings we think, we make things to ensure our survival and we symbolise our feelings, often reaching out to worlds beyond our material existence. A walk around the Museum shows that all societies hold beliefs that bond them together and form their identities.

This talk and the exhibition focus on the practice of these beliefs, their social significance and asks whether our species might better be called Homo religiosus rather than Homo sapiens.

Includes a complimentary drink.

 


Special morning tour: an introduction to the British Museum

Special morning tour: an introduction to the British Museum

Wednesday 6 September 2017 - Sunday 1 October 2017
Wednesdays, Saturdays and Sundays
8.50-10.00
£30 per person

Explore the oldest space in the Museum and discover the history of the collection in this special tour led by a trained guide, before the galleries open to the public. Places are limited to a maximum of 20 to provide a unique visiting experience.

In Room 1 (Enlightenment) and Room 2 (Collecting the world) you will learn how the world was understood by Europeans in the 18th century, tracing the beginning of the British Museum and the development of the extraordinary collection. This provides a wonderful introduction before exploring other galleries in the Museum.

The tour will begin at 09.00 and will last for 60 minutes. Please come to the Main entrance on Great Russell Street (WC1B 3DG) promptly at 08.50 with your email confirmation.

Price includes a British Museum souvenir guide book 


Spectator Scythians exhibition breakfast and curator talk

Spectator Scythians exhibition breakfast and curator talk

7 October 2017, 08.45 - 11.00
British Museum
£24.50 per person, no concessions

Join us for an exclusive morning view of the BP exhibition Scythians: warriors of ancient Siberia on Saturday 7 October.

2,500 years ago groups of formidable warriors roamed the vast open plains of Siberia. Feared, loathed, admired – but over time forgotten Until now. This major exhibition explores the story of the Scythians – nomadic tribes and masters of mounted warfare, who flourished between 900 and 200 BC. Their encounters with the Greeks, Assyrians and Persians were written into history but for centuries all trace of their culture was lost – buried beneath the ice.

Spectator readers will enjoy a breakfast in the Great Court Restaurant with an introduction from the exhibition curator and the opportunity to enter the exhibition before it opens to the public.

Exhibition supported by BP 


The Crick Crack Club presents Beowulf

The Crick Crack Club presents Beowulf

Sunday 5 November 2017, 14.30-17.00
BP Lecture Theatre
£8, Members/concessions £6

Myths retold is a series of performances of some of the greatest stories in the world, presented in collaboration with the Crick Crack Club. Enter a flickering cave of wonder for a wild exploration of epic and myth.

Beowulf is the oldest story in the English language – and it still has the power to raise the hairs on the back of the neck. It tells of a hero’s life, a life that is mapped by three tremendous blood-curdling encounters. Here monsters (and their mothers) are gruesomely defeated and dragons still guard gold.

Charged with adrenaline and poetry, this ancient story, performed by Hugh Lupton, explores the journey we all make from the seeming invincibility of youth, to the heroic vulnerability of old age.

'Ferocious, vigorous, playful' Birmingham Words

'Master storyteller' The Times

Widely acclaimed throughout the UK as the master of poetic storytelling, Hugh Lupton's distinctive style focuses on richly crafted use of the English language. An award-winning performer and writer, he has collaborated widely with singers and musicians and other performers. In 2005, he won the Classical Association prize for ‘the most significant contribution to the public understanding of the classics’ with Daniel Morden. His first novel was published in 2010 and his song ‘One in a Million’ (co-written with Chris Wood) won the BBC2 Folk Awards for ‘Original Song of the Year’ 2005. 


The Crick Crack Club presents The Curled Tongue

The Crick Crack Club presents The Curled Tongue

Sunday 8 October 2017, 14.30-17.15
BP Lecture Theatre
£8, Members/concessions £6

Myths retold is a series of performances of some of the greatest stories in the world, presented in collaboration with the Crick Crack Club. Enter a flickering cave of wonder for a wild exploration of epic and myth.

'Out with you upon the wild waves, Children of the King! Henceforth your cries shall be with the birds.'

In ancient Ireland, words held true power to alter reality and determine the future.

Clare Murphy walks the old paths of this beautiful and ever-shifting landscape to bring us a contemporary performance of Irish myths that is tautly laced with wit and verve.

Enter the realm of feral curses, lost children, epic transformations, prophecy, fate and betrayal.

Clare Muireann Murphy was born in Dublin, and has lived in Spain, America, Galway and London, and currently resides in Bristol. A dynamic and witty performer, she has performed in festivals and theatres across the world, and her repertoire extends from her beloved Irish mythology to world folklore, anecdotes, fables, personal and original stories.

'A sheer delight! For those thirsty for a different type of show this is a must see!' Everything Theatre 


The Crick Crack Club presents the Ramayana

The Crick Crack Club presents the Ramayana

Sunday 10 December 2017, 14.30-17.00
BP Lecture Theatre
£8, Members/concessions £6

Myths retold is a series of performances of some of the greatest stories in the world, presented in collaboration with the Crick Crack Club. Enter a flickering cave of wonder for a wild exploration of epic and myth.

Deep in the forest, Rama and Sita live in exile, eyes watch their every move, and the universe shimmers with illusion. When Sita is kidnapped by the ten-headed demon king, Rama needs all the help he can get. Who better to have on your side than a shape-shifting monkey?

But there’s only one thing worse than a bloodthirsty demon, and that’s his big brother. As Rama lies helpless on the battlefield, it’s time for Sita’s little-known story to unfold...

Storyteller Emily Hennessey and virtuoso sitar player Sheema Mukherjee conjure up a vivid, wild and beguiling world in this retelling of the much-loved Indian epic.

Emily Hennessey has worked and travelled extensively in India, which kindled in her a great love of Hindu mythology. She has travelled over 10,000 miles across India, has lived and worked with a yak-herding family on the Tibetan plateau, studied Kathakali dance-drama in Kerala and spent several months at the Kattaikkuttu School in Tamil Nadu, learning from the children who perform stories from the Mahabharata through music, dance and song. While studying Drama and Theatre Studies at the University of Kent, she met storyteller Dr Vayu Naidu, completed a storytelling apprenticeship with her, and later trained with Ben Haggarty. She's also trained with Indian Pandvani performer Ritu Verma. Emily has toured in India with the British Council and performed at the Delhi Storytelling Festival. Emily is a key member of the Pandvani108 ensemble. Sheema Mukherjee absorbed North Indian classical music and the western tradition side by side, studying sitar and Indian classical music under the tutelage of her uncle, Pandit Nikhil Banerjee, and then with Ustad Ali Akbar Khan. Brought up between Britain and India, she has a rich background to draw on in her own compositions and collaborations. Today she is an established sitar player and composer, a regular in Transglobal Underground playing sitar and electric bass, a key member in The Imagined Village project, and a collaborator with internationally renowned artists from many genres. Sheema has collaborated with Courtney Pine, Sir John Tavener, Martin Carthy, Bobby McFerrin, Boris Grebenshikov, Natacha Atlas, Noel Gallagher and Cornershop, Mercan Dede, and Bulgarian folk singer Yanka Rupkina. She has toured the world widely and key performances include The World Music Festival (Chicago), Montreux Jazz Festival, supporting Jimmy Page and Robert Plant (1998), and the Olympics Arts Festival for Sydney 2000. She also makes regular appearances at WOMAD (UK). 


The art of Scythian warfare

The art of Scythian warfare

Saturday 4 November 2017, 14.30-15.45
BP Lecture Theatre
£5, Members/concessions £3

Mike Loades (as seen on Time Commanders on BBC Four) is a leading historical weaponry expert, as well as author, presenter, action arranger and director.

In this special event he will demonstrate Scythian archery and warfare practices using a replica Scythian bow and showcase newly recorded footage of ancient Siberian equestrian techniques. 


Young Friends Sleepover: medicine though time

Young Friends Sleepover: medicine though time

21-22 October 2017, 18.00 - 09.00
Registration in Room 4
£45.00
Young Friends can come to an exciting sleepover on the theme of medicine through time. Through craft workshops, participatory activities and storytelling sessions, Young Friends and their guests will learn how medicine has changed through history as a result of science, war, and belief systems across different cultures. Explore the British Museum at night and discover how the practice of medicine has changed through history.

Do the roaring lion pose or curl like a cat to find out how yoga first began – and how it has influenced the way we exercise today. Make a body part (ew!) and offer it at the altar of the god Asclepius in the ancient Greek galleries. Listen to stories of horrible healing from the Middle Ages, and diagnose our Renaissance victim's disgusting disease!

At the end of the evening Young Friends and their guests will spend the night sleeping in the Egyptian and Assyrian galleries surrounded by kings and gods from the ancient world. In the morning there will be breakfast and a chance to visit the BP exhibition Scythians: warriors of ancient Siberia.