Group Booking

Group Booking

Every day
Enter through King Edward entrance on Montague Place
Free, booking essential

Due to the significant increase in tour group visitors and to make the visitor experience pleasant for all visitors, it has become necessary for all tour groups to book their visit to the museum at least seven days in advance.

If bookings are not made in advance, groups may be denied immediate entry to the museum.

All tour groups must enter the museum using the King Edward entrance on Montague Place. This entrance provides space for group visits and dedicated coach parking.

Please be advised that if you wish to avoid the busiest times for tour group visits, you should not book for the 10:00, 14:00, or 15:00 time slots.

During the booking process please specify the number in your group and also if the majority of your visit will involve any one area of the Museum's collection. If you will be visiting many areas of the Museum but not one specific area in depth please put your group number in the 'General admission' category during the booking process.

If the people in your group are aged under 18, please use this ticket category regardless of area visited. If you are a UK school and are looking to make use of the Ford Centre for Young Visitors or book any of our workshops/galleries please do not book in via this link but visit the 'Learning' section of the website for further booking information

If any of your group have specific access needs please see the 'Visiting' section of the Museum's website for more information on all facilities available. This is also where you will find details of our full Visitor Regulations. 


Highlights Tour: around the world in 90 minutes

Highlights Tour: around the world in 90 minutes

Every Friday, Saturday and Sunday, 11.30 and 14.00 Tours meet at the Information Desk £14 per person

Explore the British Museum’s most famous treasures with an illuminating 90-minute guided tour. Discover the Rosetta Stone, the Lewis Chessmen and the Parthenon sculptures, as well as some lesser-known but fascinating objects, with expert guidance that will take you to the heart of the Museum’s collection.

This tour is designed for an adult audience and is not recommended for children under the age of 12. Please note that the tour will visit a number of galleries on different floors of the Museum and involves a considerable amount of walking. 


Members' Exclusive Lecture - Inspiring Rodin

Members' Exclusive Lecture - Inspiring Rodin

Monday 9 April 2018
18.30 – 20.00
BP Lecture Theatre

Curator Ian Jenkins will talk about the upcoming exhibition Rodin and the art of ancient Greece. This major exhibition will feature around eighty works by Rodin and tell the story of the artist’s fascination with the Parthenon sculptures. The famous Greek sculptures had a tremendous impact on Rodin’s creation of the human form, inspiring such works as the Kiss.

£15, includes a complimentary drink, booking required.

 


Members' Exclusive Lecture - Making a living in Iron Age Britain

Members' Exclusive Lecture - Making a living in Iron Age Britain

Monday 30 April 2018
18.30 – 20.00
BP Lecture Theatre

What was it like to live in Britain before the arrival of the Romans? Curator Dr Julia Farley explores what life was like for the farmers and warriors who lived in these islands over 2000 years ago. Using archaeological evidence from recent finds, as well as treasures from the British Museum’s collections, this talk will follow the daily, seasonal and generational cycles of prehistoric communities. Although organic materials such as wood and textiles are rarely preserved, the remains from settlements can help to reveal the worlds these people created, and their relationships with plants, animals and the landscape. Julia will also explore the playful way that creatures and textile patterns were incorporated into some of the most famous Celtic art objects from this period.

£15, includes a complimentary drink, booking required.

 


Members' Exclusive Lecture - The Thirty Years War: Why did it take so long to make peace?

Members' Exclusive Lecture - The Thirty Years War: Why did it take so long to make peace?

Monday 19 February 2018
18.30 – 20.00
BP Lecture Theatre

The Thirty Years War (1618-48) was Europe’s most destructive conflict prior to the two twentieth-century world wars. At least 5 million people died in the Holy Roman Empire, the war’s principal battleground, or one in five of the population. It was widely believed at the time and subsequently that the conflict was an All Destructive Fury, unleashed by the pent-up religious hatred following the Reformation, and stoked by international tensions. Once begun, the war seemed to spiral out of control, becoming impossible to stop. Though the concluding Peace of Westphalia has been much discussed as a major milestone towards a modern world order, comparatively little attention has been paid to why the conflict lasted so long. Peter H. Wilson will address this, examining why peace proved so elusive and how this terrible war was eventually brought to an end.

Includes a complimentary drink.

 


Members' Exclusive Tour: The Charmed Life of John Craxton

Members' Exclusive Tour: The Charmed Life of John Craxton

Saturday 7 July 2018
09.00 – 10.00
Gallery 5

A private tour of the exhibition Charmed lives in Greece: Ghika, Craxton, Leigh Fermor.

The exhibition focuses on the friendship of the artists Niko Ghika and John Craxton and the writer Patrick Leigh Fermor. It brings together their artworks, photographs, letters and personal possessions in the UK for the first time. The tour will be led visiting curator and art historian Ian Collins. He is currently working on a biography of his friend John Craxton and has also recently co-written the book Artist and Lover: The Photographs of Joan Leigh Fermor.

This special curator-led tour before the Museum opens to the public is exclusive to Members. This is an intimate and in-depth look at the exhibition presented by the exhibition curator.

Please note that only a small number of tickets will be available on this tour to ensure that Members have the best experience when visiting. Please meet 10 minutes before the start time at the Information Desk in the Great Court.

 


Members' Exclusive Tour: The Charmed Life of John Craxton

Members' Exclusive Tour: The Charmed Life of John Craxton

Wednesday 20 June 2018
09.00 – 10.00
Gallery 5

A private tour of the exhibition Charmed lives in Greece: Ghika, Craxton, Leigh Fermor.

The exhibition focuses on the friendship of the artists Niko Ghika and John Craxton and the writer Patrick Leigh Fermor. It brings together their artworks, photographs, letters and personal possessions in the UK for the first time. The tour will be led visiting curator and art historian Ian Collins. He is currently working on a biography of his friend John Craxton and has also recently co-written the book Artist and Lover: The Photographs of Joan Leigh Fermor.

This special curator-led tour before the Museum opens to the public is exclusive to Members. This is an intimate and in-depth look at the exhibition presented by the exhibition curator.

Please note that only a small number of tickets will be available on this tour to ensure that Members have the best experience when visiting. Please meet 10 minutes before the start time at the Information Desk in the Great Court.

 


Members' Exclusive Tour: The Charmed Lives of Niko Ghika and Patrick Leigh Fermor

Members' Exclusive Tour: The Charmed Lives of Niko Ghika and Patrick Leigh Fermor

Thursday 19 April 2018
09.00 – 10.00
Gallery 5

A private tour of the exhibition Charmed lives in Greece: Ghika, Craxton, Leigh Fermor.

The exhibition focuses on the friendship of the artists Niko Ghika and John Craxton and the writer Patrick Leigh Fermor. It brings together their artworks, photographs, letters and personal possessions in the UK for the first time. The tour will be led by two of the visiting curators. Sir Michael Llewellyn Smith was formerly HM Ambassador to Athens and was a friend of Patrick and Joan Leigh Fermor. Evita Arapoglou is an art historian and authority on Niko Ghika, whom she knew well.

This special curator-led tour before the Museum opens to the public is exclusive to Members. This is an intimate and in-depth look at the exhibition presented by the exhibition curators.

Please note that only a small number of tickets will be available on this tour to ensure that Members have the best experience when visiting. Please meet 10 minutes before the start time at the Information Desk in the Great Court.

 


Members' Exclusive Tour: The Charmed Lives of Niko Ghika and Patrick Leigh Fermor

Members' Exclusive Tour: The Charmed Lives of Niko Ghika and Patrick Leigh Fermor

Saturday 26 May 2018
09.00 – 10.00
Gallery 5

A private tour of the exhibition Charmed lives in Greece: Ghika, Craxton, Leigh Fermor.

The exhibition focuses on the friendship of the artists Niko Ghika and John Craxton and the writer Patrick Leigh Fermor. It brings together their artworks, photographs, letters and personal possessions in the UK for the first time. The tour will be led by two of the visiting curators. Sir Michael Llewellyn Smith was formerly HM Ambassador to Athens and was a friend of Patrick and Joan Leigh Fermor. Evita Arapoglou is an art historian and authority on Niko Ghika, whom she knew well.

This special curator-led tour before the Museum opens to the public is exclusive to Members. This is an intimate and in-depth look at the exhibition presented by the exhibition curators.

Please note that only a small number of tickets will be available on this tour to ensure that Members have the best experience when visiting. Please meet 10 minutes before the start time at the Information Desk in the Great Court.

 


Members' late viewing of Rodin and the art of ancient Greece

Members' late viewing of Rodin and the art of ancient Greece

Monday 30 April 2018
18.00-19.30
Room 30

A Members-only late night viewing of the exhibition  Rodin and the art of ancient Greece.

Discover how ancient Greek sculpture inspired Rodin to set a radical new direction for modern art. In 1881 the French sculptor Auguste Rodin visited London for the first time. On a trip to the British Museum, he saw the Parthenon sculptures and was instantly captivated by the beauty of these ancient Greek masterpieces. Experience the magnificent sculpture of a modern master, and explore how the ancient world shaped his artistic vision.

All Members will need to book in advance of their visit for late night viewings of the exhibition (please note: this does not apply to visiting during normal opening hours). You are welcome to wait in the Museum until your timeslot. The Members’ Room will not be open for the duration of the evening and will close at 17.30. However, you can wait in the Great Court or visit the Great Court Café.

 


Remixed ode to rebel’s spirit: lyrical meditations on Haiti and Toussaint Louverture

Remixed ode to rebel’s spirit: lyrical meditations on Haiti and Toussaint Louverture

Friday 16 March 2018, 18.30-20.00
Stevenson Lecture Theatre
£5, Members/concessions £3

In response to the Asahi Shimbun Display A revolutionary legacy: Haiti and Toussaint Louverture, Haitian-born artist-anthropologist Gina Athena Ulysse methodologically rummages through the past and present to contemplate this unearthed history. She offers a multivocal remix of words (archival and oral history, poetry, personal narrative) interlaced with chants that honour this decolonial spirit of defiance. 


Spectator Readers Only Exclusive: Living with gods exhibition breakfast and curator talk

Spectator Readers Only Exclusive: Living with gods exhibition breakfast and curator talk

Saturday 17 March 2018, 08.45-11.00
British Museum
£24.65 per person, no concessions

Join us for an exclusive morning view of Living with gods: peoples places and worlds beyond on Saturday 17 March.

Beliefs in spiritual beings and worlds beyond nature are characteristic of all human societies. By looking at how people believe through everyday objects of faith, this exhibition provides a perspective on what makes believing a vital part of human behaviour. Seeing how people believe, rather than considering what they believe, suggests that humans might be naturally inclined to believe in transcendent worlds and beings. Stories, objects, images, prayers, meditation and rituals can provide ways for people to cope with anxieties about the world, and help form strong social bonds. Together, the objects in the exhibition offer a fresh perspective on practices of belief and how they are hugely important for societies, as well as individual believers.

Spectator readers will enjoy a breakfast in the Great Court Restaurant with an introduction from the exhibition curator and the opportunity to enter the exhibition before it opens to the public.

Exhibition supported by the Genesis Foundation. With grateful thanks to John Studzinski CBE. 


Stiff competition: an evening of comedy with the Z List Dead List

Stiff competition: an evening of comedy with the Z List Dead List

Thursday 22 March 2018, 19.30–22.00
BP Lecture Theatre

Take an irreverent and amusing look at the not-so-famous people who have been unfairly consigned to the dustbin of history.

Comedian Iszi Lawrence (creator and host of The Z List Dead List podcast and show) is joined by four (currently) notable people who will highlight their unsung historical heroes and battle it out to win the audience's approval for their unsung historical hero.

James Harkin is a QI Elf and produces QI's Radio 4 show The Museum of Curiosity, co-authored the last five QI books and co-presents the QI podcast No Such Thing As A Fish, along with its spin-off TV show No Such Thing As The News.

Andy Riley is an Emmy-winning scriptwriter, cartoonist and children's author whose whose screen credits include Veep, Black Books, Little Britain and Tracey Ullman's Show. His 14 books include the bestselling Bunny Suicides series (not for kids) and the King Flashypants series (absolutely for kids).

Emma Kennedy is a ten times author, screenwriter and occasional actor. She won Masterchef, Mastermind, is a World Record Holder and Gillian Anderson once gave her a spatula for Christmas.

...and a curator to be named soon...

You can’t pop into the Museum without being assaulted by all manner of objects honouring some celebrated stiff. But what of the forgotten heroes – the weird and wonderful characters that are a mere footnote in the annals of history? Hoping to snatch them from the jaws of obscurity, the four advocates of these overlooked overachievers will plead their case to the assembled public (that’s you). At the end of the show, you’ll vote for the person who is most deserving of our recognition.

What Members said about previous Stiff competition evenings:
'I laughed plenty.'
'I laughed out loud!'
'So much fun.'
'Iszi was an excellent compere.'
'More of this style of event please!'
'Really enjoyed this evening. My wife who was sceptical came away very enthusiastic and we would definitely come again.'
'It was well organised and great fun.'

Members may purchase tickets for up to six guests.

 


The Crick Crack Club presents 1001 Nights

The Crick Crack Club presents 1001 Nights

Sunday 11 March 2018, 14.30-17.00
BP Lecture Theatre
£8, Members/concessions £6

Myths retold is a series of performances of some of the greatest stories in the world, presented in collaboration with the Crick Crack Club. Enter a flickering cave of wonder for a wild exploration of epic and myth.

A king betrayed by his wife, decides to wreak his revenge on womankind by bedding, then slaughtering, one virgin every night... but then he meets Sheharazade.

Sheharazade, the storyteller who saved her own life together with the lives of her children by telling stories for a thousand and one nights, is one of the great cultural creations of the Arab world. Stories nestle within stories, with demons, errant spouses, thieves, fools and comedians all jostling for attention.

The fabulous Egyptian storyteller and performer Chirine El Ansary returns to the Crick Crack Club to tell some of the most intriguing and deliciously seductive episodes from The Nights, stories that explore the deepest passions and desires of men and women.

Chirine El Ansary
Cairo born, and Le Coq and Goldsmith’s trained in Paris and London, Chirine El Ansary is a storyteller and physical performer living in Egypt and France, and working in French, English and Arabic. Chirine was one of the first performers to perform in the ancient buildings in the heart of the old city of Cairo, and in the markets and old palaces of Damascus and Aleppo. Today she is an international storyteller and has performed in cities diverse as Sana’a, Nairobi, Zanzibar, Johannesburg, Rome, Naples, Rotterdam, Paris and London.

Presented as part of HeForShe Arts Week. 


The Crick Crack Club presents The Liberty Tree – Robin Hood and other English radicals

The Crick Crack Club presents The Liberty Tree – Robin Hood and other English radicals

Sunday 8 April 2018, 14.30-17.00
BP Lecture Theatre
£8, Members/concessions £6

Myths retold is a series of performances of some of the greatest stories in the world, presented in collaboration with the Crick Crack Club. Enter a flickering cave of wonder for a wild exploration of epic and myth.

For over 600 years stories of Robin Hood have held sway in the English imagination. With Little John, Will Scarlet, Much the miller’s son, Friar Tuck and the rest of the Merry Fellowship, Robin Hood inhabits a place in the leafy shadows of our minds – somewhere where it’s always high summer, where venison is always being roasted, where tyranny rides roughshod over the green freedoms of England and where the wrongs and injustices of the world are mended by subversion and trickery.

Hugh Lupton and Nick Hennessey tell and sing their way deep into the secret, dappled heart of Sherwood and the ancient tradition of English dissent.

Hugh Lupton is the poet of the storytelling world. His distinctive style focuses on richly crafted use of the English language. An award-winning performer and writer, he has collaborated widely with singers and musicians, and in 2005, he won the Classical Association prize for ‘the most significant contribution to the public understanding of the classics’ with Daniel Morden. And behind all that beautiful English poetry lurks a wicked sense of humour.

Nick Hennessey is a singer, songwriter and performance storyteller. He is a dynamic and passionate performer whose love for the traditional culture of northern Europe forges together the note, the song and the spoken word into a unique, engaging style. He has worked extensively at folk, storytelling and literature festivals across the UK and toured to Estonia, Sweden, Norway, Netherlands, Belgium, Denmark, Canada and Japan. A distinctive singer and harpist, Nick has published three solo albums, the most recent of which, A Rare Hunger, received critical acclaim on BBC Radio 3’s Late Junction and in the USA. 


The Invisible Enemy Should not Exist: Michael Rakowitz & Jon Snow in conversation

The Invisible Enemy Should not Exist: Michael Rakowitz & Jon Snow in conversation

Thursday 29 March 2018, 13.30-14.30
BP Lecture Theatre
Free, booking essential

To coincide with the unveiling of 12th commission of the Mayor of London’s Fourth Plinth Programme in Trafalgar Square, artist Michael Rakowitz’s joins journalist and Channel 4 News presenter Jon Snow to discuss his sculpture The Invisible Enemy Should not Exist.

It is based on a lamassu, a winged bull and protective deity that stood at the Nergal Gate of Nineveh from around 700 BC. The British Museum's collection includes several lamassu from Nineveh, Khorsabad and Nimrud.

Michael Rakowitz is an acclaimed artist whose multidisciplinary practice engages the senses as a means of sparking discourse around pressing political, social and historical issues. An American of Iraqi-Jewish origin, Rakowitz creates conceptual art that is known for establishing unexpected connections. In doing so, he forges entirely new and composite narratives that challenge and engage the audience in a vibrant revival of the past. Rakowitz is Professor of Art Theory and Practice at Northwestern University and has shown his work in venues worldwide. Over the years, he has been honoured with many awards for his work, which also features in major private and public collections around the world. Jon Snow joined ITN in 1976 and became Washington Correspondent in 1984. Since then, he has travelled the world to cover the news – from the fall of the Berlin Wall and the release of Nelson Mandela, to Barack Obama's inauguration and the earthquake in Haiti. His many awards include the Richard Dimbleby Bafta award for Best Factual Contribution to Television (2005), and Royal Television Society awards for Journalist of the Year (2006) and Presenter of the Year (2009). He has been the face of Channel 4 News since 1989. He is also a member of the Fourth Plinth Commission Group, which selected Michael’s work for the Fourth Plinth. 


Who owns history? David Olusoga and Dan Snow in conversation

Who owns history? David Olusoga and Dan Snow in conversation

Saturday 10 March 2018, 14.30-15.30
BP Lecture Theatre
Free, booking essential

Almost half a century since Kenneth Clark’s original 1969 BBC television series Civilisation, the role of history in our society has profoundly changed, with a multiplicity of new stories, voices and perspectives emerging in how it is researched and told.

In this special event, David Olusoga, acclaimed historian and co-presenter of the BBC’s new TV series Civilisations, joins broadcaster and historian Dan Snow to discuss the question of who owns history, and the role of marginalised histories in reshaping a singular narrative of history with a pluralistic one.

Presented in collaboration with History Hit as part of the BBC Civilisations Festival. 


Young Friends Sleepover: how to be an archaeologist

Young Friends Sleepover: how to be an archaeologist

7-8 April 2018, 18.15- 09.00
Registration in Room 4
£45.00

Young Friends can come to an exciting sleepover to find out how to be an archaeologist.

Find out about the history of archaeology – from the first excavations to what they do today, and what role they have played in the history of the British Museum. See what we can learn from ancient tombs and crack forgotten languages. Discover the story behind some of the objects in the collection and how they came to be in the Museum.

At the end of the evening Young Friends and their guests will spend the night sleeping in the Egyptian and Assyrian galleries surrounded by kings and gods from the ancient world, followed by breakfast in the morning.

 


Young Friends Sleepover: how to be an archaeologist

Young Friends Sleepover: how to be an archaeologist

10-11 March 2018, 18.15- 09.00
Registration in Room 4
£45.00

Young Friends can come to an exciting sleepover to find out how to be an archaeologist.

Find out about the history of archaeology – from the first excavations to what they do today, and what role they have played in the history of the British Museum. See what we can learn from ancient tombs and crack forgotten languages. Discover the story behind some of the objects in the collection and how they came to be in the Museum.

At the end of the evening Young Friends and their guests will spend the night sleeping in the Egyptian and Assyrian galleries surrounded by kings and gods from the ancient world, followed by breakfast in the morning.