Alexander with the Spear replica

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A replica of Alexander the Great (the Greek king) moulded from the original in the Louvr? Museum, Paris. Cast from the department of Greek, Etruscan, and Roman Antiquities, it is an example of Hellenistic Art (ancient Greece influenced art), dated 3rd-1st centuries BC.

The statuette echoes a portrait of Alexander the Great made around 330 BC by Lysippus, court sculptor to the king of Macedon. Alexander is portrayed as a conqueror, his left hand gripping a spear (now lost), his right the knob of a sword (also missing). He is wearing a headdress, as with most examples of Hellenistic Art. His heroic nudity evokes the sacred cult devoted to him after his death (323 BC), particularly in Egypt under the reign of the Ptolemies.

More about the statue

The statue's extremely elongated silhouette and the deliberately reduced proportions of the head are part of the taste for slender figures which its artist, Lysippus, introduced in the second half of the fourth century BC. The length of the head represents an eighth part of that of the body; the sculptor, then, has broken with the classical tradition set out in the canon of Polyclitus, which favored a shorter body, in which the length of the head represented only a seventh part of that of the body.

The figurine also expresses the artist's concern to inscribe the human body in a three-dimensional space. The composition is open, thanks to the movement of the head toward the right and the outstretched left arm to the side. In addition, Lysippus adopts a balance which goes beyond the "contrapposto" developed by Polyclitus around the middle of the fifth century BC: the tension in the legs, the slight turning of the right knee, and the suggestion of a highly realistic stride capture the figure as in a snapshot.

  • Product Code: CMCN447120
  • Size: 18.5cm (tall) x 8cm (wide) x 4cm (thick)
  • Material: Resin with patina
  • Details: Replica of an orginal artefact that currently resides in the Louvre Museum, Paris

A replica of Alexander the Great (the Greek king) moulded from the original in the Louvr? Museum, Paris. Cast from the department of Greek, Etruscan, and Roman Antiquities, it is an example of Hellenistic Art (ancient Greece influenced art), dated 3rd-1st centuries BC.

The statuette echoes a portrait of Alexander the Great made around 330 BC by Lysippus, court sculptor to the king of Macedon. Alexander is portrayed as a conqueror, his left hand gripping a spear (now lost), his right the knob of a sword (also missing). He is wearing a headdress, as with most examples of Hellenistic Art. His heroic nudity evokes the sacred cult devoted to him after his death (323 BC), particularly in Egypt under the reign of the Ptolemies.

More about the statue

The statue's extremely elongated silhouette and the deliberately reduced proportions of the head are part of the taste for slender figures which its artist, Lysippus, introduced in the second half of the fourth century BC. The length of the head represents an eighth part of that of the body; the sculptor, then, has broken with the classical tradition set out in the canon of Polyclitus, which favored a shorter body, in which the length of the head represented only a seventh part of that of the body.

The figurine also expresses the artist's concern to inscribe the human body in a three-dimensional space. The composition is open, thanks to the movement of the head toward the right and the outstretched left arm to the side. In addition, Lysippus adopts a balance which goes beyond the "contrapposto" developed by Polyclitus around the middle of the fifth century BC: the tension in the legs, the slight turning of the right knee, and the suggestion of a highly realistic stride capture the figure as in a snapshot.

  • Product Code: CMCN447120