Antinous Bust Replica

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<p>A replica of a marble portrait head of Antinous, produced using a mould created with 3D printing technology. This replica has been cast from a mould of a 3D print of a portrait head of Antinous, the lover of the Roman emperor Hadrian. He is shown here as the Greek god Dionysus, wearing a wreath of ivy. The original is on display in the Museum in Room 70, in Ancient Greece and Rome. This attractive replica represents the fascinating meeting of modern technology with ancient art, and would make the perfect gift or addition to your home. <br /> <br /><b> History meets cutting-edge technology </b> <br /> <br /> This replica has been created exclusively for the British Museum by ThinkSee3D, experts in 3D digital heritage. It is part of the British Museum's wider work with 3D technology, building on the AHRC funded MicroPasts project. <br /> <br /> This technology was also used to recreate a replica of the Ancient Egyptian Statue of Roy. This project is the first time the British Museum has been able to use 3D technology to produce something to buy. This exciting use of technology means that this replica has been created faithfully with no damage to the original object, at a reduced size from the 81cm statue on display. <br /> <br /> To create a replica, ThinkSee3D takes the British Museum Digital Team's scans of artefacts on display in the Museum?s galleries and produces 3D prints from which moulds are made. These moulds are then used for production of the replicas which are cast using traditional techniques and finished by British artists. <br /> <br /><b> About the original </b> <br /> <br /> The original head was found in 1770 built into a late antique wall on the Gianicolo (or Janiculum) hill in Rome, Italy with other fragments of the statue. Antinous was a young Greek from Bithynia (northern Turkey). In the AD 120s, he became the lover of emperor Hadrian (r. AD 117-138) and joined his court. In AD 130 Antinous drowned in the river Nile in Egypt. Hadrian mourned him openly and Antinous was worshipped as a god.</p>

Exclusive to the British Museum, a replica bust of Hadrian’s lover Antinous.

This replica has been cast from a mould created by a 3D print of a portrait head of Antinous, wearing a wreath of ivy as a symbol of the Greek god Dionysus. The original can be seen in the British Museum’s Ancient Greece and Rome collection.

The original head was found in 1770 built into a late antique wall on the Gianicolo, or Janicalum hill in Rome, along with other fragments of the statue.

Antinous was a youth from Bithynia in northern Turkey who became the lover of emperor Hadrian (r.AD 117-138). Antinous drowned in the River Nile in AD 130, and in his grief, Hadrian commissioned busts and statues of his beloved, who was subsequently worshipped as a god. As the cult of Antinous spread throughout the Roman Empire, many more statues were erected. Today Antinous has more sculptures to his name than almost any other figure from classical antiquity.

Through comparisons to coin portraits, archaeologists have worked studiously to define the corpus of Antinous, basing their identification primarily on his hairstyle, aquiline nose and full lips.

History meets technology:

This replica has been created by ThinkSee3D, using 3D technology to faithfully recreate an artefact with no risk of damage to the original. The 3D scans create moulds of the original objects, which are then cast and finished by British artists using traditional techniques. This forms part of the British Museum’s wider work with 3D technology, building on the AHRC funded MicroPasts project.

An historic ornament to sit on any mantelpiece or desk.

  • Product Code: CMCR60870
  • Product Weight: 2.5Kg
  • Theme: Ancient Greece
  • Dimensions: H25 x W13 x L15cm
  • Material: 3D printed resin
  • Details: Handmade in the UK
  • Postage Weight: 4.10 Kg

<p>A replica of a marble portrait head of Antinous, produced using a mould created with 3D printing technology. This replica has been cast from a mould of a 3D print of a portrait head of Antinous, the lover of the Roman emperor Hadrian. He is shown here as the Greek god Dionysus, wearing a wreath of ivy. The original is on display in the Museum in Room 70, in Ancient Greece and Rome. This attractive replica represents the fascinating meeting of modern technology with ancient art, and would make the perfect gift or addition to your home. <br /> <br /><b> History meets cutting-edge technology </b> <br /> <br /> This replica has been created exclusively for the British Museum by ThinkSee3D, experts in 3D digital heritage. It is part of the British Museum's wider work with 3D technology, building on the AHRC funded MicroPasts project. <br /> <br /> This technology was also used to recreate a replica of the Ancient Egyptian Statue of Roy. This project is the first time the British Museum has been able to use 3D technology to produce something to buy. This exciting use of technology means that this replica has been created faithfully with no damage to the original object, at a reduced size from the 81cm statue on display. <br /> <br /> To create a replica, ThinkSee3D takes the British Museum Digital Team's scans of artefacts on display in the Museum?s galleries and produces 3D prints from which moulds are made. These moulds are then used for production of the replicas which are cast using traditional techniques and finished by British artists. <br /> <br /><b> About the original </b> <br /> <br /> The original head was found in 1770 built into a late antique wall on the Gianicolo (or Janiculum) hill in Rome, Italy with other fragments of the statue. Antinous was a young Greek from Bithynia (northern Turkey). In the AD 120s, he became the lover of emperor Hadrian (r. AD 117-138) and joined his court. In AD 130 Antinous drowned in the river Nile in Egypt. Hadrian mourned him openly and Antinous was worshipped as a god.</p>

Exclusive to the British Museum, a replica bust of Hadrian’s lover Antinous.

This replica has been cast from a mould created by a 3D print of a portrait head of Antinous, wearing a wreath of ivy as a symbol of the Greek god Dionysus. The original can be seen in the British Museum’s Ancient Greece and Rome collection.

The original head was found in 1770 built into a late antique wall on the Gianicolo, or Janicalum hill in Rome, along with other fragments of the statue.

Antinous was a youth from Bithynia in northern Turkey who became the lover of emperor Hadrian (r.AD 117-138). Antinous drowned in the River Nile in AD 130, and in his grief, Hadrian commissioned busts and statues of his beloved, who was subsequently worshipped as a god. As the cult of Antinous spread throughout the Roman Empire, many more statues were erected. Today Antinous has more sculptures to his name than almost any other figure from classical antiquity.

Through comparisons to coin portraits, archaeologists have worked studiously to define the corpus of Antinous, basing their identification primarily on his hairstyle, aquiline nose and full lips.

History meets technology:

This replica has been created by ThinkSee3D, using 3D technology to faithfully recreate an artefact with no risk of damage to the original. The 3D scans create moulds of the original objects, which are then cast and finished by British artists using traditional techniques. This forms part of the British Museum’s wider work with 3D technology, building on the AHRC funded MicroPasts project.

An historic ornament to sit on any mantelpiece or desk.

  • Product Code: CMCR60870
  • Product Weight: 2.5Kg
  • Theme: Ancient Greece
  • Dimensions: H25 x W13 x L15cm
  • Material: 3D printed resin
  • Details: Handmade in the UK
  • Postage Weight: 4.10 Kg
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