Cyrus cylinder perspex ornament

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A  perspex replica of the Cyrus the Great Cylinder Babylon 539 BC. 

The Cyrus Cylinder is often referred to as the first bill of human rights as it appears to encourage freedom of worship throughout the Persian Empire and to allow deported people to return to their homelands.

It was inscribed in Babylonian cuneiform (cuneiform is the earliest form of writing) on the orders of the Persian King Cyrus the Great (559–530 BC) after he captured Babylon in 539 BC.

 It was rediscovered in Babylon in modern Iraq in 1879 during a British Museum excavation and has been on display ever since.

Part of a range to accompany the Museum's major exhibition I am Ashurbanipal: king of the world, king of Assyria.

More about the exhibition

 The BP exhibition I am Ashurbanipal: king of the world, king of Assyria (8 November 2018 – 24 February 2019) tells the story of Ashurbanipal through the British Museum’s unparalleled collection of Assyrian treasures and rare loans.

Ashurbanipal was king of the Assyrian empire and is thought to be its last great ruler. At the time of his reign (669–c. 631 BC), Assyria was the largest empire in the world, stretching from Cyprus in the west to Iran in the east, and at one point even included Egypt.

The exhibition explores Ashurbanipal’s world through spectacular displays that evoke his palace and highlights the importance of preserving Iraq’s rich cultural heritage for future generations.

  • Product Code: CMCN513980
  • Dimension: 15cm x 10cm x 5cm
  • SUBTITLE: British Museum
  • Material: Lucite
  • Weight: 0.30 Kg

A  perspex replica of the Cyrus the Great Cylinder Babylon 539 BC. 

The Cyrus Cylinder is often referred to as the first bill of human rights as it appears to encourage freedom of worship throughout the Persian Empire and to allow deported people to return to their homelands.

It was inscribed in Babylonian cuneiform (cuneiform is the earliest form of writing) on the orders of the Persian King Cyrus the Great (559–530 BC) after he captured Babylon in 539 BC.

 It was rediscovered in Babylon in modern Iraq in 1879 during a British Museum excavation and has been on display ever since.

Part of a range to accompany the Museum's major exhibition I am Ashurbanipal: king of the world, king of Assyria.

More about the exhibition

 The BP exhibition I am Ashurbanipal: king of the world, king of Assyria (8 November 2018 – 24 February 2019) tells the story of Ashurbanipal through the British Museum’s unparalleled collection of Assyrian treasures and rare loans.

Ashurbanipal was king of the Assyrian empire and is thought to be its last great ruler. At the time of his reign (669–c. 631 BC), Assyria was the largest empire in the world, stretching from Cyprus in the west to Iran in the east, and at one point even included Egypt.

The exhibition explores Ashurbanipal’s world through spectacular displays that evoke his palace and highlights the importance of preserving Iraq’s rich cultural heritage for future generations.

  • Product Code: CMCN513980
  • DIMENSIONS: 15cm x 10cm x 5cm
  • Weight: 0.30 Kg
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