Happiness Buddha Netsuke

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<p>Netsuke are miniature sculptures invented in 17th century Japan to serve a practical function. <br /> <br />Traditional Japanese garments - robes called <em>kosode</em> and <em>kimono</em> - had no pockets; however, men who wore them needed a place to store their personal belongings, such as pipes, tobacco, money, seals, or medicines. Their solution was to place such objects in containers (called <em>sagemono</em>) hung by cords from the robes' sashes (<em>obi</em>). <br /> <br />The containers may have been pouches or small woven baskets, but the most popular were beautifully crafted boxes (<em>inro</em>), which were held shut by <em>ojime</em>s - sliding beads on cords. Whatever the form of the container, the fastener that secured the cord at the top of the sash was a carved, button-like toggle called a <em>netsuke</em>. <br /> <br />Netsuke, like the inro and ojime, evolved over time from being strictly utilitarian into objects of great artistic merit and an expression of extraordinary craftsmanship.</p>

A hand-crafted boxwood ornament depicting a smiling Buddha.

Buddhism is one of the most popular religions in Japan, and images of the Buddha are common. Here the smiling figure is seated in the traditional lotus pose, and is exuding serenity.

About Netsuke:

Netsuke are Japanese miniature ornamental sculptures which were originally invented in the 17th century during the Edo Period to serve a practical function. Traditional robe garments, such as kosode and kimono had no pockets, so men would carry small, often ornamental containers called inro which they would secure to their obi sashes with a cord fastened with a carved netsuke. Netsuke, originally plain toggles, evolved into highly detailed artistic creations, often representing humans, gods and animals.

A beautiful gift inspired by religion and culture.

  • Product Code: CMCN417040
  • Dimensions: H3.6 x W4 x L3.9cm.
  • Material: Boxwood
  • Postage Weight: 0.03 Kg

<p>Netsuke are miniature sculptures invented in 17th century Japan to serve a practical function. <br /> <br />Traditional Japanese garments - robes called <em>kosode</em> and <em>kimono</em> - had no pockets; however, men who wore them needed a place to store their personal belongings, such as pipes, tobacco, money, seals, or medicines. Their solution was to place such objects in containers (called <em>sagemono</em>) hung by cords from the robes' sashes (<em>obi</em>). <br /> <br />The containers may have been pouches or small woven baskets, but the most popular were beautifully crafted boxes (<em>inro</em>), which were held shut by <em>ojime</em>s - sliding beads on cords. Whatever the form of the container, the fastener that secured the cord at the top of the sash was a carved, button-like toggle called a <em>netsuke</em>. <br /> <br />Netsuke, like the inro and ojime, evolved over time from being strictly utilitarian into objects of great artistic merit and an expression of extraordinary craftsmanship.</p>

A hand-crafted boxwood ornament depicting a smiling Buddha.

Buddhism is one of the most popular religions in Japan, and images of the Buddha are common. Here the smiling figure is seated in the traditional lotus pose, and is exuding serenity.

About Netsuke:

Netsuke are Japanese miniature ornamental sculptures which were originally invented in the 17th century during the Edo Period to serve a practical function. Traditional robe garments, such as kosode and kimono had no pockets, so men would carry small, often ornamental containers called inro which they would secure to their obi sashes with a cord fastened with a carved netsuke. Netsuke, originally plain toggles, evolved into highly detailed artistic creations, often representing humans, gods and animals.

A beautiful gift inspired by religion and culture.

  • Product Code: CMCN417040
  • Dimensions: H3.6 x W4 x L3.9cm.
  • Material: Boxwood
  • Postage Weight: 0.03 Kg
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