Anne Enright – Adam and Eve: the genesis of blame

Anne Enright – Adam and Eve: the genesis of blame

Friday 23 February 2018, 18.30-19.30
BP Lecture Theatre
£10, Members/concessions £8

An LRB winter lecture by Anne Enright.

It is already hard to remember those strange days of early 2017, when women were held responsible for the bad behaviour of men. As the mirror is turned to reflect those in power, it is worth pausing to ask what that was all about. Why were their actions so difficult to see properly? How do we attach blame? This lecture looks at the story of Adam and Eve, the long sway it held over the western imagination, before Eve went on Twitter and called out the snake.  


Armageddon and the Roman VIth Ferrata Legion

Armageddon and the Roman VIth Ferrata Legion

New excavations at Legio, Israel, and early Jewish-Christian-Roman relations

Thursday 1 February 2018, 16.00-17.00
BP Lecture Theatre
Free, booking essential

In the late 1st and early 2nd centuries AD, dangerous Jewish (and incipient Christian) rebels were causing problems for the Roman Empire in Palestine. Though the First Revolt resulted in the destruction of the temple in Jerusalem in AD 70 and in the establishment of a permanent base of the Xth Legion there, these groups continued to harass their overlords. Historical sources indicate that the Roman VIth Ferrata Legion was deployed to Palestine in the early 2nd century to provide support for the Xth, a sure sign that the rebels were acting up again. The VIth Legion established their base somewhere near Megiddo, but its exact location has been a longstanding question in the archaeology of the period.

In this lecture, Matthew J Adams, Albright Institute Jerusalem, reveals how the Jezreel Valley Regional Project searched for potential locations of the elusive fortress, using historical and geographical sources, aerial photography, and remote sensing. In 2013 and 2015, one of these locations was examined by excavation, providing the first glimpse of a 2nd-century Roman military base yet uncovered in the entire eastern Empire. Together with the early Christian Prayer hall discovered by Yotam Tepper of the Israel Antiquities authority in 2005 in the adjacent Jewish village of Caparcotani, the new excavations have new implications for Jewish-Christian-Roman relations and for the composition of the Book of Revelation. 


Behind the Parthenon sculptures: new discoveries

Behind the Parthenon sculptures: new discoveries

Thursday 22 February 2018, 13.30 - 14.30
BP Lecture Theatre
Free, booking essential

At this special event, architect Vassileia Manidaki from the Acropolis Restoration Service and British Museum Curator Ian Jenkins discuss issues surrounding the restoration programme of the Acropolis monuments, as well as fascinating new discoveries concerning the sequence of the Parthenon frieze, and the construction of the west pediment.

Presented in collaboration with the British School of Archaeology at Athens. 


Curator's introduction to Living with gods: peoples, places and worlds beyond

Curator's introduction to Living with gods: peoples, places and worlds beyond

Thursday 15 March 2018, 13.30-14.30
BP Lecture Theatre
Free, booking essential

Exhibition Curator Jill Cook gives a 45-minute illustrated introduction to the exhibition Living with gods: peoples, places and worlds beyond


Linda Colley: Can history help?

Linda Colley: Can history help?

Friday 2 March 2018, 18.30-19.30
BP Lecture Theatre
£10, Members/concessions £8

An LRB winter lecture by Linda Colley.

Now more than ever it seems as if events are overtaking us. How can we bring history to bear on such a moment? Is learning and thinking about the past still a valuable thing to do? If so, what kinds of history should we be reading or, indeed, writing?  


Reading Margery Kempe's inner voices

Reading Margery Kempe's inner voices

Friday 9 March 2018, 13.30-14.30
BP Lecture Theatre
Free, booking essential

Charles Fernyhough, Professor of Developmental Psychology at the University of Durham, discusses the English mystic Margery Kempe (c. 1373–after 1438), whose work The Book of Margery Kempe is considered the first autobiography in English. He explores how Margery's descriptions of her voice-hearing experiences can help to refine psychological and neuroscientific accounts of hallucinations. 


Rosemary Hill: What does she think she looks like?

Rosemary Hill: What does she think she looks like?

Monday 12 March 2018, 18.30-19.30
BP Lecture Theatre
£10, Members/concessions £8

An LRB winter lecture by Rosemary Hill.

Clothes come between the naked self and the world. They affect the way we are seen and they imply something about how we see ourselves, something that seems especially true for women.

Writer and historian Rosemary Hill asks whether this is compensation for the fact women have less scope for action than men, or whether it is an advantage to have that extra sense Virginia Woolf called ‘frock consciousness’. 


The nature of prayer

The nature of prayer

Thursday 25 January 2018, 13.30 - 14.30
BP Lecture Theatre
Free, booking essential

The Revd Canon Giles Fraser, Priest-in-Charge of St Mary's Newington, Kennington, famous for his inspiring contributions to the BBC's Thought for the Day and column in The Guardian, considers how people pray and what prayer does for us. 


Vishnu's chariot in London: the story of a processional chariot from south India

Vishnu's chariot in London: the story of a processional chariot from south India

Friday 16 February 2018, 13.30-14.30
BP Lecture Theatre
Free, booking essential

Richard Blurton, Curator of South Asian collections at the British Museum, tells the fascinating story of a major processional chariot and discusses the context in which it was made and used.